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Terra Relicta Top 20 Of 2017



01. Lacrimosa
- Testimonium
02. Sólstafir
- Berdreyminn
03. Soror Dolorosa
- Apollo
04. Ulver
- The Assassination Of Julius Caesar
05. Myrkur
- Mareridt
06. Sun Of The Sleepless
- To The Elements
07. Moonspell
- 1755
08. Au Champ Des Morts
- Dans La Joie
09. Andras
- Reminiszenzen...
10. Svartsinn
- Mørkets Variabler

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Funus - Adrift Alone (2016) - Review

Band: Funus
Album title: Adrift Alone
Release date: 30 April 2016
Label: Self-Released

Tracklist:
1. A Mind To Break
2. My Hate For You
3. Rosefield Road
4. Adrift Alone
5. Grey Sun

Funus is a band hailing from the depths of The Netherlands and their music can be described as a dark atmospheric journey through the abyss, though quoted or referred as psychedelic doom this was just something I had to check out. Adrift Alone is their second full lenght after the self-titled debut which was released back in 2009. To describe the whole album is a bit tricky because there are so many influences implemented into it.

The first track named "A Mind To Break" has a very dark ambient feel to it, with that they top it with blistering double bass and furius vocals. The music stands on itself transporting the listeners into a trance of dark nightmares, the music plays a nice tribute to the dsbm scene despite the fact the band is nothing like a dsbm band instead of that they're building the song foundation on heavy drums and dark guitar tunes. Lyrical wise it's an interesting concept with story about loss and greif. The second track, "My Hate For You", however fits into the category doom and with slow paced glommy riffs they build up a solid wall of guitars.

The drums never really go outside its own structure of some typical doom bands, there are some tendencies to go wild and make groovy parts, but this drummer simply keeps its steady and slow, when needed it builds up the whole song giving it more depth... The album has a tone and structure which reminds of the erie cold atmosphere which reminds me to the older stuff of Shining.

The overall sound on on the album is most of all a nice blend of black metal and doom metal, really well mixed into the whole spectrum, partly it has that vibe of classic norwegian black metal sound while still keeping the style more doom oriented. Sometimes find it a bit hard to grasp everything, they do a hell of a good job making it all fit. The best way to sum up everything on this album is to say it's a dark morbid story that never ends raging up and down between the stages of grief, sorrow and depression. The album is a clear 6 out of 10 for me, I personally would like to hear slightly more doom orientation in it but hey these guy do a great job anyway and I recommend everyone to check out Funus if you are into black metal and doom in the vein of early Shining.

Review written by: Oliver
Rating: 6/10

Disclaimer: This is a guest review and it does not necessarily represent the point of view of the Terra Relicta staff.

Recommended by Terra Relicta

Band: Dawn Of Oblivion
Album title: Phoenix Rising
Release date: 25 April 2015
Label: M&A MusicArt

Phoenix Rising is a work that leads the listener through many different emotional, dark and mystical states, and thus serves with many musical variations all centered around deep gloomy and atmospheric gothic metal. Even though Dawn Of Oblivion don't discover any new territories soundwise, they carefully blend those typical 90s gothic metal lines, so familiar to the maestros of the genre like are Tiamat and Paradise Lost, with some guitar riffs used by Therion on Theli or Vovin, and to make the thing even more audacious and sinister they add a pinch of black metal and doom elements on a couple of occasions, but yet at the same time they don't forget that their heritage is in gothic rock. Many elements could resemble to The Sisters Of Mercy or even more to The Fields Of Nephilim. Still, some oriental vibes, like used in the miffed iconic goth metal piece "Anubis", or floydian ambiances in the emotional and soothing "Within The Realms Of The King Of Amur" that are similar to those used back then by Tiamat on Wildhoney or on A Deeper Kind Of Slumber make their sound special in many ways. Dawn Of Oblivion with this album showed that it's still possible to make astounding things within the gothic metal realms.

Read a full review HERE